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    JOB DESTRUCTION NEWSLETTER
    by Rob Sanchez
    May 06, 2004 - No. 1041
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The American Business for Legal Immigration has been one of powerful lobbies that push H-1B and L-1 visas. They are changing their name to CompeteAmerica. Their new spin is to tell America that to be globally competitive we must not restrict outsourcing and we must allow unlimited numbers of H-1B and L-1 visa holders to come into the U.S.

Members of the H-1B visa coalition used to call themselves American Business for Legal Immigration. But given the new lobbying emphasis on boosting U.S. competitiveness, the group changed its name last month to Compete America. Members include more than 200 trade organizations, universities and companies such as Motorola Inc., Intel Corp. and Texas Instruments Inc.

Corporate lust for cheap labor is their agenda and they have the clout to win. You can see the cash rich power-players that signed this petition to Congress to raise H-1B by going to this webpage: http://www.competeamerica.org/news/alliance_pr/20040505_letter.html

Their website is a globalist barrage of worker shortage-shouting and anti-American slurs. Spend some time there and you will see what I mean.

For more background on the ABLI go to this webpage: http://www.zazona.com/ShameH1B/Skunks.htm#ABLI

The article below has some good news and bad news for the H-1B shills.

First the bad news for the shills:

The lobbyists' chances of success [to increase H-1B] appear slim, especially in an election year.

Now the good news for the shills:

But the lobbyists take heart that some Republicans seem sympathetic, including Senate Judiciary Chairman Orrin Hatch of Utah, who has supported exemptions in the past, and Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia. A spokesman for Sen. Chambliss said he is waiting for business lobbyists to make a strong case that they need additional foreign workers.

Orrin Hatch has been one of the most powerful promoters of H-1B and now he has an ally - Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia. In case you forgot, Chambliss is the sponsor of a bill that he claims reforms the L-1 visa (S.1635). Unfortunately this sham of a bill is working its way through the Senate and is up for judicial review next week. Guess who will be heading the hearing - Orrin Hatch! I give this bill a good chance of being approved because it gives the appearance of reform while allowing "business as usual". Talk about the fox guarding the hen house!

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-Neil Smith-


http://www.collegejournal.com/successwork/workplacediversity/20040317-munoz.html
Strapped Employers Hope
To Expand Visa Program
By SARA SCHAEFER MUNOZ
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

From The Wall Street Journal Online


March 17, 2004 -- WASHINGTON -- Manufacturers and high-tech companies
are starting a long-shot effort to persuade Congress to boost the
number of visas allowed for foreign workers with advanced degrees from
U.S. universities, as a way to get around a cap on visas.

Given the growing political concern about sluggish job growth in the
U.S., companies that depend on foreign workers say it is unlikely they
can win a direct expansion of the number of H1-B visas from the current
limit of 65,000 a year; all of the visas for fiscal 2004 -- which began
Oct. 1 -- were handed out by February. Instead, the companies are
looking to circumvent the limit by carving out exceptions for the most
highly educated employees, figuring there will be less opposition to
those workers.

Proponents also are tapping into fears that U.S. jobs will be
outsourced abroad as a selling point, arguing that if more foreign
workers aren't admitted to the U.S., American businesses will ship the
work to other nations instead.

"It's counterproductive for the U.S. to train foreign scientists and
engineers and then send them home to compete against American
businesses," said Sandy Boyd, a vice president of the National
Association of Manufacturers and chairman of a coalition currently
dedicated to freeing up more H1-B visas.

H1-B visas are a class of employer-sponsored visas that enable a
specialized worker to remain in the U.S. for a maximum of six years.
During the late 1990s, after intense lobbying from high-tech firms that
complained of labor shortages during the Internet boom, the cap on the
number of workers given the visas annually was raised above 65,000,
reaching 195,000 by 2001. But the cap reverted to 65,000 after efforts
to retain a higher level failed last year, as unemployment rose in the
high-tech sector.

Under current rules, there already is one exception to the ceiling:
H1-B visa holders who work at universities or nonprofit
research-and-development agencies. High-tech lobbyists want to add
another exception for applicants who have earned master's or doctorate
degrees from U.S. universities. If approved, the expansion would add
thousands of visas, though the exact number is unclear. Workers with an
education equivalent to a master's degree or above in all professions
accounted for 42% of the H1-B visa holders in 2002, according to U.S.
immigration statistics. But the statistics don't say whether the
workers have U.S. degrees.

The lobbyists' chances of success appear slim, especially in an
election year. Some lawmakers, including Sen. Chris Dodd, a Democrat,
and Rep. Nancy Johnson, a Republican, both of Connecticut, have
introduced bills that would tighten regulations for skilled guest
workers, not loosen them. Organized labor is against any visa
expansion. Some Democrats have said they might consider approving some
exemptions in exchange for greater Labor Department authority to
investigate alleged H1-B visa violations and the reinstatement of a
$1,000 filing fee that formerly was used to fund job-retraining
programs.

But the lobbyists take heart that some Republicans seem sympathetic,
including Senate Judiciary Chairman Orrin Hatch of Utah, who has
supported exemptions in the past, and Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia.
A spokesman for Sen. Chambliss said he is waiting for business
lobbyists to make a strong case that they need additional foreign
workers.

By limiting the visa exception to U.S.-trained scientists and
engineers, advocates could argue that the U.S. already has invested in
the workers and is reaping the rewards. "They have been educated in
American universities but still have the knowledge, cultural skills and
language skills of their home country," said Elizabeth Dickson, an
immigration adviser who manages work permits for Ingersoll-Rand Co.

Members of the H-1B visa coalition used to call themselves American
Business for Legal Immigration. But given the new lobbying emphasis on
boosting U.S. competitiveness, the group changed its name last month to
Compete America. Members include more than 200 trade organizations,
universities and companies such as Motorola Inc., Intel Corp. and Texas
Instruments Inc.
    

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